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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 760 (some duplicates have been removed)
everyday people who came in here to escape discretion and there are too. homeless families. last thursday i joined the many volunteers and like mayor newsom before me, i'm simply not satisfied with our progress. over the last 10 years residents have left the streets for permanent housing and services. and over the last seven years through our homeward bound program we have reunited several people to go in their home communities. last year there were no cuts to human health services and i was proud to get funding for other home services but but this is about better reform and innovation. last year, i invited former serious to work with our outstanding human services director and other to apply his bold ideas to homelessness and he's jumped in feetfirst. we now have everyday connect to provide a year around benefits of services. we have online portals so that no people goes hungry so long as they're on our streets. we are going to build a new 1 hundred bed facilities here in the bay area. and under a federal lifeline program a program that this supervisor has add vatd for many homeless peop
the homeless population and we will tell you why this is so important. >> ktvu channel 2 morning news continues. >>> this is ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> well, good morning, welcome to a brand-new day, tuesday january 29th, i am dave clark. >> are you wondering what the weather will look like? >> thank you dave and pam. there are some clouds out there and some locations are 50 and 60 degrees but temperatures will rebound and here is sal. >>> traffic is moving well on northbound 280 getting to highway 17 and that traffic continues to look good and also traffic looks good on highway 92 headed out to the high-rise, let's go back to the desk. >>> new hazing allegations in a high school, here is more on why police are now getting involved and we have questions that still need to be answered, tara? >> reporter: we spoke with somebody who is familiar with the campus and they say the coach's office is inside the locker room and the question is was he there during the alleged attack, did it happen during school hours or after school hours, these are questions police will delve into to see if the adm
the experiences of homeless teens in north america and the efforts by covenant house to help them. newark mayor cory booker, wrote the forward to the book, participate in the discussion, and it's about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thanks so much for being he here. please toggle bit about why you decide to be a part of the process. >> first of all i've known kevin for a long time, and he's one of america's humble heroes and has been for my entire, our entire journey together. covenant house fits right into newark, new jersey. it has a location right in newark, new jersey, with a hard and the spirit and soul that does so much for our city. i've met the kids, young people come through it and i was very moved. so knowing you and knowing about covenant house, it was a no-brainer. but i felt very privileged to write the forward for it because it gave me a chance to recognize the fact that my dad, but for the kindness of others, would have been homeless himself. he was born to a single mother, the report. my father that exaggerates even more dramatically so he was not poor, he was just trying to. he coul
the chance to recognize the fact that my dad would have been homeless himself. he was born to a single mother, very poor. my father is even more dramatic. he was not poor. be waso po, couldn't afford the other two letters. bit was an extraordinary community that is very intact and watchful of the children, and my father was taken in by another family, whose extraordinary love kept my father of a trajectory forward, and hen was going to go to college, people in the community put dollars together to help him afford his first quarter of tuition. so all these things which i call the conspiracy of law that happened that made me who i am today, but starts with the young people and what bothers me is about our society, is we talk so dramatically and in such a negative fashion about the adults who fill our prisons, and we don't realize that every one of those adults was a child who we could have done more for, to prevent a lot of the challenges they face as an adult, and i think douglass said at it easier to raise strong children than to heal broken men. so i just feel a real urgency in america that
like as a homeless person, you have basic human rights? >> no. no. been treated like dogs. >> how one bay area law may, plans to end discrimination against the homeless. what's behind the homeless bill of rights. >>> after it was ruptured by a construction crew, now new concerns they are building too close to a pipeline. >>> and you see them all over bay area freeways. brightly lit flashing billboards. the results of a new study that says they are dangerous for drivers. and good evening, i'm ann notarangelo. protecting the civil rights of homeless people. that's the idea from a state assembly member but not everyone is on board with the idea. some of the more controversial provisions of the bill have been toned down already. cbs 5 reporter elissa harrington has details of the so-called homeless bill of lights. >> reporter: the homeless bill of rights would be all about freedom from discrimination. do you feel like as a homeless person, you have basic human rights? >> no. no. been treated like dogs. >> reporter: that type of sentiment is what's behind a proposed homeless bill of rights
reproductive rights. it is about access. and we will go below the line to hear from america's homeless children, but first, these boots were made for combat. good morning, i'm melissa harris-perry. this week marked the second of two seismic shifts in the united states military in just over two years. the first was december of 2010 when president obama signed the repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" law and ending a policy that mandated shame and secrecy as requirements for service. the second happened on thursday when defense secretary leon panetta joined the joint chiefs of staff chairman martin dempsey and made this announcement. >> we must open up service opportunities for women as fully as possible. and therefore today, general dempsey and i are pleased to announce that we are eliminating the direct ground combat exclusion rule for women. and we are moving forward with a plan to eliminate all unnecessary gender-based barriers to service. >> just like that, 200,000 military combat jobs that were once off limits for women are potentially open to any woman who meets the qualifications. more i
to get your thoughts on homelessness and what the city is doing about homelessness, what direction you think we should be headed in, a big issue in san francisco. >> homelessness is interesting. when you look at it as a sociological perspective, we have some of the people in the homeless community enjoying being on the street. others want help. i think when we also -- we need to do a better job of taking care of those mentally ill. when you are on the street and you listen to the homeless folks or you watch them interacting, you see they are a little disturbed. i think the city overall has done a good job in terms of housing and taking them off the street, providing services. mayor newsom started a private -- program connecting members of the homeless community to services, dental, vision, therapy, housing, mental health. these are things that you and i probably take for granted. we have access and resources we can leverage. this community doesn't. in the southeast part of the city, we don't have many homeless facilities. there is one that i know of, providence baptist church. every ni
like this, back into the mental health facility and the hospitals and the non-the homeless shelters and get these people off the street, these officers are going to have not have half of the problems that is where the money should be going instead of the ridiculous conversations. thank you. >> thank you, next speaker please? >> good morning, thank you for having this hearing today. >> my name is jeremy miller i am with the stelli foundation and the san francisco no taser task force and i would like to six points. number one, the police assassination of vanbue and parong were nothing other an assassination and should not be used in this context, especially prolong whos family requested that the case nod not to be exploited for this. >> two, as regards commander ali assertion that a person under the influence of drugs or experiencing mental health episodes would have a greater pain tolerance, the documented science regarding that point is inconclusive what is ininclusive is the severe threat to their vital health that is posed by tasing such an individual. >> three, in portland just a
. >>> many refugees arriving in japan are looking for sancuary but end up homeless. among them is a growing number of africans. so why is their almost to harsh? eisuke takahashi explains. >> reporter: this man says he arrived from nigeria in november. he applied to the justice ministry for refugee status. in nigeria, islamic extremists continue to terrorize and attack christians. he says they killed his father and younger brother, both christians. he also says he fled to japan because his life was in danger. he arrived in japan with about $500, but it lasted only a week. he has been homeless for nearly two months now. >> reporter: the first thing he ate in japan was a bowl of seasoned beef and rice. that was his last square meal. >> reporter: in japan, refugees cannot work for six months after applying for asylum. the government gives them $16 per day for living expenses and $440 per month for housing. but the number of applicants is rising, so it takes as long as three months to process the payments. on this day, the african man went to a major train station in tokyo. he headed to the men'
. tori? >>> 7:38. happening now -- a homeless count is underway in the south bay. ktvu's janine de la vega has been following a team of volunteers who are collecting some key information. good morning, janine. >> reporter: good morning. we're here at overfelt gardens park. we've been following, as you said, one of the teens who have a tally sheet to record how many people are living on the street. early this morning, volunteers met to get matched up with a homeless guide and go through training on how to do the homeless count. these teams were paired up and went through cars sand some of them walked the streets and searched areas where the homeless hang out. the last time a count was done was more than two years ago. local officials want to see if that number has grown. this will help the city and county qualify for over $10 million in federal grant money. it will help them assess the efficiency and to plan for resources in the future. we spoke with one homeless man, who volunteered why he wanted to volunteer -- who shared why he wanted to volunteer. >> i don't plant be to be -- plan
representing the local homeless board and i also have staff from human service agency [speaker not understood]. and we are bringing to your attention the proposed resolution approval for the upcoming 2012 continuum of care fund and p obligation we're doing for hud. we've been doing this since 2008 because we're required to bring the resolution to you since then. as you know, the san francisco local homeless coordinating board which is the san francisco obligation for the [speaker not understood] housing and urban development continuing care grants homeless assistance. in 2011 computation had awarded san francisco over $19,74 3,333 -- 34 dollars in competitive continuous care homeless assistance grants. actually the first in the country last year. in 2012 the proposed resolution would [speaker not understood] to apply for $23,572,2 80 including an estimated $99 3,9 10 devoted to new permanent housing for currently homeless people [speaker not understood]. we call touch-tone bond project which we've been doing everywhere. [speaker not understood] provide homeless individuals [speaker not unders
of homeless camps. leads to more than half a dozen arrests of sex offenders! we tell you what prompted the search. next a woman is shocked in the face by a suspect with a stun gun. near a san francisco intersection. police say, the suspect was after the victim's cell phone. we go live to the scene of the attack. that's where we find kron 4's philippe djegal. philippe - the attack >> yes, pam. police say the attack happened in broad daylight. with several witnesses in the area. one of those witnesses also tells me the attack happened at this bus stop. but in the end. the suspect left empy handed. this is an example of what police say a man used to try and rob a woman of her purse and cellphone tuesday. witnesses say the suspect and the victim then got into a scuffle at this bus stop on divisadero at haight street at around 1-20 in the afternoon. police say the suspect stunned the woman at least twice. the second time in the torso. before running off without any of the woman's belongings. jumping into a waiting car. double parked on the street. >> pam: police say it appears the suspect s
as you know as a city, we have been working with other cities to deal with the issue of homelessness within our veteran population. we have been involved with the hundred days campaign to house veterans in 2012. president obama established a goal to end veteran's homelessness by 2015 which i think is doable and the department of housing and urban development came together to establish the hud slash veterans housing program which, is models after section eight and san francisco has received 500 of the vouchers to date. we have learned that our chronically homeless veterans were having a difficult time finding apartments in the private marked in fact many veterans have had vouchers issued in 1212 and so what we have here is a situation where we have a federal agency, the mayor's office and housing authority and human services agency who have focused to encourage private landlords to provide housing for these veteran and is a few months ago one of those landlords the owner of 2524 mission street came forward to offer to least his 33 stew apartments which are above the restaurant on j
for the division of homelessness. and today i come to oppose against tasers and i have to maintain why i oppose against tasers. because they are killing people. the tasers are killing people and we have several number of people that be killing for the police. they be shooting for the police. and the reason why oposing and we are oposing against tasers. so i prefer to see something given, i prefer to see like a weekend create kind of level and consciousness to the police to let me how killing the people. or to feeling better to the people, immigrants like latinos or people who come from around the world to this country. so we don't need to create more, new, forms of how we can killing people. first this is a killer. tasers are killers and we have already known these numbers. so please supervisors be supporting and oposing against tasers, again any time that tasers are weapons to killing people, more with mental illness, for homelessness, with living without any protection, any support. so please, against tasers, thank you so much. >> thank you, next speaker, please? >> couple other cards. david
of them who are genuinely homeless or mentally ill, desperate people. >> every big city has food kitchens gore. the reason that people are on the streets asking for change is overwhelmingly drugs and alcoho >> i wasn't homeless. it was just a easy way to get money. >> john buster used to make a living handhandling. >> the best day? maybe $150. >> did he have trouble finding a job? >> i didn't look f no job. that was my job. >> panhandling as a job is common in san francisco, young, healthy kid beg for spare change. >> got to eat. got drink. >> tried to interview some of the kids. >> wake up in the morning, start drinking, good to bed, do it again. pretty much the same. >> they have the most deep-seated sense of entitlement i've ever come across. >> want to be able to sit where we want to. >> nobody is going to make us. >> punish homeless people for being homeless when insufficient shelter space is unavailable. >> homeless advocates say government should solve this problem by spending more on social services, shelter, subsidies for affordable housing, jobs programs. >> this is a solution t
underway right now. volunteers have spread out across san francisco to count the city's homeless residents one by one. amber lee is live and tells us why getting that number right is so critical. amber. reporter>> julie right now hundreds of volunteers are walking neighborhoods all over the city to count homeless people. the census is done once every two years and the information is used to provide services. ramirez says her day job at the hospital involves working with homeless patients. doing this count she says is another way of helping. >> you kind of see the other side of it and see those folks that we haven't helped yet but they're out on the street and just get that word out there. reporter>> the city has to conduct the census in order to receive more than $20 million annually in federal funding for homeless services. >> i used to bar tend in new york and i could not get a bar tending job here. reporter>> this couple says they hope the census count will help get better services. >> the ones they offer aren't very good. reporter>> the last count found the number of homeless declining
their country and then fell on hard times. how dozens of homeless veterans finally got a place of their own. >>> a new apartment building was opened in san francisco today. this is now home for dozens of homeless veterans. ktvu's rob roth is in the city tonight and tells us how it is giving them an opportunity to restart their lives. rob? >> reporter: frank, this 9 story building near mission and 13th street is home to dozens of veterans who had no place to live. >> reporter: 80-year-old howard is home, he fought in the korean war. i was homeless till i get here. >> reporter: he is one of 75 veterans who served their country but found themselves in motels, or on the streets. now each is in a studio apartment to help them stay on their feet. >> i thought i was never going to get around. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: this morning officials hosted the opening of this apartment building. the first one for veterans in a dozen years. >> they put their lives on the lines, surrendered their youth, yeah, it is a big deal. big deal. >> reporter: he spent three years in the army, but a divorce
is talking to 49ers fans. >>> volunteers will be spreading out into the city looking for homeless people. we will tell you why. >>> plus, taking a another look at california's gun laws. show and tell will be part of a big meeting in sacramento today. . >>> well, good morning to you, this is january 29th, already tuesday, pam >> i think so. time now is 5:30, well, let's talk about the weekend then, is it going to rain? how is the weather? >> in here? >> yes, here, more about here. >> no, maybe next week this time. we do have a lot of high clouds over us. that is an honest question, pam, thank you. >>> just a lot of high clouds, breezy conditions half-moon bay, 36 miles per hour out of the north, here is sal. >>> traffic on 237, and crossing 880 traffic is moving nicely and also traffic is moving well on 880 southbound. let's go back to the desk. >>> an 8-year-old girl has become the latest victim in the growing street violence. they will be talking about the city's crime violence and i know you are in oakland now, what do you know? >> reporter: well we know later today, the police chief will
there in terms of budget priorities. >> with your plans on dealing with homelessness? >> it is homelessness in general and behavior on the streets. we need to make sure people have access to services. i was a supporter of putting the money we taking the money we're putting into the system to provide housing. we need to make sure people have access to services. we need to make sure that we have standards of behavior on our streets. most homeless people did not cause any problems on our streets. they are a small group the causing problems. we need to make sure we have the standards of behavior. there are some kinds of behavior that are not ok and they need to report that. . she mentioned housing needs. what are the housing needs? how should the board of supervisors address these? >> there are a few different areas we need to address. housing affordability or lack there of is a major challenge for the city. it is harder to afford housing in the city if you are lower or middle income. we need to address that. i want to focus on work force housing. we do a good job of generating high in housing.
to go far to see someone in need. 15,000 people are homeless in d.c., including about 1000 families. >> there's a lot of homeless people year. >> here is the city council wish list -- topping it, homeless services welfare programs, and education for $9.5 billion. tomorrow, we should know more about the budget surplus. the city's chief financial officer will release the annual report and we might hear more from the mayor and city council as to what their ideas are. >> thank you. still to come, college graduates are being hit especially hard right now when it comes to finding work and their education could be the problem. >> taking a live look outside, we're looking forward to a few days of warmth after this long cold spell. >> in front of the superdome we're getting ready for super bowl 47 in the shadow of the french quarter. the reagans arrived this afternoon. they're getting ready for the biggest game of their life -- >> the summer anniversary today -- the 27th anniversary of the space shedder -- space shuttle challenger disaster. exploded 73 seconds into flight. it was
of this story here is the death you talked about. the death of a homeless woman who was staying in an encampment of 198 in the woods. she and others were trapped as the floodwaters came pouring in. >> it was i weakening. we had to get up and go. i woke up and seen all the camp beneath the he was one of five homeless people who decided to ride out the storm at their camp in the woods. by morning rescue workers had to help him, his friend, and two dogs out after flood waters came pouring in. >> there is no warning. no time at all. >> it began to overtake the tense after officials released water in the world. she asked we not show her face but says she is angry that those in the camp were not warned what was coming. >> they know there is homeless out here but they do not give anybody -- and say hey get out. >> we found him searching for his friend and a young woman they looked after at the camp. by early afternoon rescue workers pulled the body of a woman from the icy waters. >> everything everybody has is gone. this is the only thing i have left anymore. >> there is concern here. the mayor said th
discriminations by the shia-led government. almost a million remain homeless in the philippines. thousands of shark fins discovered on a rooftop in hong kong. controversial delicacy is booming. ♪ less than a week before he is due to be sworn in for a second term, the latest news on venezuelan president is not encouraging. the government says hugo chÁvez is suffering from complications from a severe lung infection after cancer surgery in cuba of. >> under pressure for more information on the state of the nation's leader, venezuelan officials have told us more about hugo chÁvez's cancer. >> falling the sensitive surgery on december 11, commander hugo chÁvez has faced complications as a consequence of a severe lung infection which has resulted in a respiratory deficiency that requires hugo chÁvez to remain in strict compliance with his medical treatment. >> chÁvez successor has been appearing regularly assuring people the president will return. sooner or later, we will see commander hugo chÁvez with us. >> chÁvez only named maduro the successor last month. the last time chÁvez spoke
. anthony's has done. when you were homeless, you gave me shelter and that is mercy housing and they have come together. it's not just about food and housing, but it's about dignity and stability and respect. respect for that spark of divinity that exists in every person, respect for the possibilities as tyrone has pointed out to us and for giving back. god bless you, tyrone for not only turning your life around, but for giving back. [ applause ] so father, we have been together on many occasions, like this and father is the president of usf and he knows that this city of st. francis has been a city. when they talk about san francisco values, i take it in the most complimentary way. the values of st. francis and that is exactly what we are doing on this corner today, being channels of god's peace, giving love and light where it had not existed. but to thank each and every one of you for what you do. our mayor has been sort of the catalyst. he is where a lot of this comes together, public policy, private philanthropy and non-profit collaborations all works with the spark that makes it just
's just getting started. >> i'll tell you about a program to help keep kids from becoming homeless. >> an ivy-league college where you can learn how to run a hotel. find out more on "college and u." >> i'll tell you why one presidential monument includes a statue of his dog. >> so join us now for this week's "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm siena. we'll start with our top story. >> whether you've already got your driver's license, a learner's permit, or are still just a passenger, you're probably quite aware that the cost of gasoline has gone up a lot in recent years, and that's causing many people to rethink the cars they drive. carina reports on one answer to the high cost of gas -- electricity. >> the first cars appeared in the late 1700s. they were powered by steam, like locomotives. but soon, these horseless carriages moved to using what's called an internal combustion engine. basically, that means they ran by burning fossil fuel. and ever since, internal combustion engines have run on... >> gas. >> gas? >> gasoline? >> yes, gasoline. o
difficult time assimilating to life here. the clinic also serves several thousand homeless people. ana zeledón friendly: we have a special program where our homeless are able toalk in on a daily basis, and we have slots available for them so we can see them right away. susan fleischman: i think most patients are nervous the first time they come here. they clearly don't know what to expect. i don't know how they've heard about us, maybe from a friend, from a family member. i think they're nervous about the quality of care. i think they're nervous language-wise... "will there be someone there who speaks and understands my language?" they're worried about whether we're going to call immigration. they're worried about whether coming here will affect their children's ability to become u.s. citizens, so there's a whole host of worries. elizabeth benson forer: we try to make it so that it's easy for them to get care. it's as simple as really writing down their name. it's a self-declaration. someone can say, "i'm jose, and this is how much i earn. i earn $14,000 a year," and that's it. some o
a significant level of force as we have heard today. too often, they are viewed as homeless, non-lethal devices that temporarily incompass taits that is false. when use as intended they cause pain and as we have seen across the nation they pose a risk of serious jury or death. >> as you have heard today, in particular people with mental health problem are more likely to be at high risk of death, and with that high population in san francisco and coming in contact often with the san francisco police department, we don't want to run a risk of that population being impacted. and the aclu is also concerned with the civil rights implications that the supervisors spoke of today. you know, across the nation and in san francisco, you will see the african american communities of color are impacted by accessive use of force that would lead us to believe that once they are instituted they would also be disproportionately used against the xhupts of color. because they are easy to use it will increase over use and officers will be use it as the first line rather than reverting to what they used in training
do know that homeless people are more likely to have physical problems. we know that persons in crisis, react differently to physical reactions. and in fact, it is possible that with adrenaline and various other functions of our body, that a jolt of 50,000 volts with add both to our crisis and to possible mal adaptive reactions. thank you very much. >> thank you, next speaker, please? >> good afternoon, my name is andrew mendes and i am a san francisco resident and a volunteer of the coalition of homelessness. just to echo the sentiment of my colleagues, the crisis intervention team is nowhere being completely implemented none of the other parts of the program have been deployed. there is a 911 protocol that is meant to be deployed where the dispatch is flagged. there is no changing of protocol to responding to crisis and putting the cit officers in charge of the scene or the intense evaluation in the field. tasers would kill the effort before it has truly gone off the ground and the remarks about or by the police chief sure saying now the chief is gone. and well, let's see.
-- >> a state lawmaker from san francisco is proposing a homeless bill of rights. it basically -- the idea is to protect the civil rights of homeless people. >> statewide recommendations at a uniform plan in every california city where homeless people can get health care and find a clean bathroom or a place to stay. >> we are not going to usurp any local community's local laws about it but like to provide direction for how to alleviate homelessness. >> the goal is to help the homelessness rather than criminalize them. would also include free legal representation. >>> new this morning, a shooting in san bruno puts a teenaged girl in the hospital. it happened just before 10:30 last night near the intersection of santa teresa way and park boulevard next to cappuccino high school. the san mateo county sheriff's office says the girl who was shot was 16 years old from south san francisco. right now in stable condition. no arrests have been made. >>> across the nation, several gun shows within an hour's drive from where gunman opened fire at an elementary school in connecticut have been cancelled
fanned out across san francisco last night to count the city's homeless population. the census is taken every two years. collected data is then used to secure millions of people in federal funding to provide services to the homeless. volunteers say the count is a way of giving back. >> i'm a san francisco resident and this is a way for the city to continue to get funding to help the homeless. and i also work at san francisco general hospital. so we help a lot of homeless patients and get medical care and get back on their feet. >> last nights numbers will be added to other counts done by city staff. a final tally is expected in a few weeks. >>> we checked san francisco's last survey in 2011. et showed more than 6400 homeless living on city streets. 10% of those people reported they were part of a homeless family. 20% blame alcohol or drug abuse as a primary cause of their homelessness. >>> no question it has been a truly remarkable season for the san francisco 49ers. the niners are one of the few teams to make it to the super bowl after switching quarterbacks in the middle of the season
recovered on earth. >>> new rules at san francisco's homeless shelters, what the city is doing to keep violence from coming inside. >> high clouds moving in to the bay area right now, how much of a temperature jump for your friday? vÑ look at you guys with your fancy-schmancy u-verse high speed internet. you know, in my day you couldn't just start streaming six ways to sunday. you'd get knocked off. and sometimes, it took a minute to download a song. that's sixty seconds, for crying out loud. we know how long a minute is! sitting, waiting for an album to download. i still have back problems. you're only 14 and a half. he doesn't have back problems. you kids have got it too good if you ask me. [ male announcer ] now u-verse high speed internet has more speed options, reliability and ways to connect. rethink possible. >>> life in homeless shelters is difficult and dangerous. now san francisco is implementing a new code of conduct. rob roth is here to explain how it will work. >> reporter: hundreds of homeless people are inside this shelter south of market street and next month the shelt
initially it has everything to do with housing the heads of the homeless in chicago this is key to this city of chicago for a number of reasons,, getting a goodback in 2011, 6600 homeless people were tallied in the city of chicago. the volunteers filled this west side warning center ready to count heads of the homeless in chicago especially when temperatures dipped like they have in recent days on a night like tonight you don't need a temperature gauge to tell you it's cold outside everywhere you look signs of just how frozen the city feels in almost two years people dressed for the deep freeze this couple from l.a. wisely prepared for the worst. this is a chicago we are fortunate we don't have earthquakes, we don't have floods we don't have tornadoes i will take this a few days of winter any time. this he says is far from the worst he has seen. the worst was probably january of '82 where two weekends in a row it went down to 28 lowe, 31 below into the wind chill was more than biting.below 31 below and the wind chill was more than biting. post men and women are working through it. at night c
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 760 (some duplicates have been removed)